YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
ABBREVIATION USED

ABBREVIATION USED

NEA
- National Employment Agency
MLSP
- Ministry of Labour and Social Policy
RESD
- “Regional Employment Service” Directorate
LOD
- “Labour Office” Directorate
EU
- European Union
EA
- European Area
EPA
- Emploiment Promotion Act
NAPE
- National Action Plan for Employment
“FSAE”NP
- “From Social Assistance to Employment”
   National Programme
“APD” NP
- “Assistance to People with Disabilities”
   National Programme
“HRD” OP
- “Human Resources Development”
   Operational Programme
EURES
- European Employment Services Network
NSI
- National Statistical Institute
LFS
- Labour Fors Survey
EUROSTAT
- Statistical Office of the European Commission
CPESSEC
- Centre of Public Employment Services of Southeast European Countries
1
YEARBOOK 2013
THE YEAR IN BRIEF
THE YEAR IN BRIEF

THE YEAR IN BRIEF1

In 2013 the gross domestic product of the country increased by 0.9%.

The gross domestic product (GDP) in 2013 totalled BGN 78 115 million at current prices. Recalculated in Euro, the GDP amounted to EUR 39 940 million or EUR 5493 per capita.

The gross value added increased by 1.1% in 2013.

Fixed investment was revised upward, to 2.5% growth. In the course of 2013 investment shrank by 0.3%.

In 2013 Bulgaria’s exports to the EU grew by 9.1% over 2012, totalling BGN 26.1 billion. In 2013 Bulgaria’s exports to third countries grew by 3.5% over 2012, totalling BGN 17.3 billion.

The average annual inflation rate for the period January-December 2013, compared to the period January-December 2012, was 0.9%.

The total number of employed people reached 2934.9 thousand, of whom 2889.4 thousand aged 15-64, representing a decrease of 1.6% over 2012.

In 2013 the economically active population aged 15-64 numbered 3322.7 thousand, or 68.4% of the entire population in this age group. Compared to 2012, the economic activity rate (age 15-64) increased by 1.3 pp.

The employment rate of the population aged 15-64 was 59.5%, or 0.7 pp higher than 2012.

The employment rate of the population aged 20-64 was 63.5%, or 0.5 pp higher than 2012.

The youth unemployment rate for the age group 15-24 was 28.4%, respectively 21.8% for the age group 15-29. Compared to 2012, the unemployment rates of the two groups increased by 0.3 pp and 1.0 pp respectively.

According to data of the National Statistical Institute and the Employment Agency as of 31 March 2014.
2
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
THE YEAR IN BRIEF
Long-term unemployed (for one year or longer) were 250.3 thousand people, or 57.4% of all unemployed. The long-term unemployment rate was 7.4%, representing an increase of 0.6 pp.

The economically inactive people aged 15-64 numbered 1536.5 thousand. The inactivity rate was 31.6%.

The number of discouraged people aged 15-64 was 206.5 thousand, or 19.1 thousand fewer than 2012.

The registered unemployment rate in the country in 2013 gradually decreased, from 11.9% in January and 12.0% in February to 10.7% in August (except July, when there was a slight increase of 0.1 pp). In the following months the unemployment rate increased once more and reached 11.8% in December 2013. Unlike the year before, however, the value at the end of the year was lower than at its start. The average annual registered unemployment was 11.3% (compared to 11.1% in 2012).

The average annual number of unemployed registered at labour offices increased to 371 380 (compared to 364 537 in 2012).
3
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

The positive signs of economic recovery in mid-2012 and the first indication of investment growth in 2013 put an end to the negative job loss trend. 2013 saw the first break in the trend of annual decline in employment since the beginning of the crisis, as evidenced by the stable, even slightly increased number of the employed. The average annual number of employed aged 15 and over was 2 934.9 thousand, or 0.9 thousand more than 2012 (compared to a decrease of 31.2 thousand in the period 2012-2011).

The year was marked by a rather interesting phenomenon, which was also observed on a quarterly basis, namely a parallel growth in employment and unemployment. This was due to both the still limited labour supply and the increased economic activity of the population. The decreased numbed of discouraged people and their inflow into the workforce was at the bottom of these processes. In the past year 18 thousand people who had not previously actively sought employment returned to the labour market. Their motivation to actively seek employment lay in the uplift of the labour market. While it may have increased unemployment, this was still a positive sign for the labour market, as a certain part of them, who failed to find work, entered the pool of the unemployed. These data suggest that there was some stabilisation in the labour market and are indicative of the resurgence of job-seeking after a prolonged crisis period. Discouraged people represent a labour reserve with a strong potential to strengthen the workforce.

Quarterly dynamics in 2013 continued to show seasonal growth in employment in the second and third quarter and decline in the fourth. At the end of the year there were 76.6 thousand more employed people than in the beginning. Excluding the seasonal impact, on an annual basis employment tended to rise in the first and second quarter and decrease in the third and fourth compared to the same periods in the previous year. Albeit slowly, new jobs were being created, increasing both the number of employed people in absolute terms and the value of the employment rate. The growth in the employment rate was also a result of the overall retention of employment against the accompanying population decline.

The average employment rate1 for people over 15 in 2013 was 46.9%, representing an increase of 0.3 pp compared to the previous year.

In view of the need to compare data for Bulgaria and European Union Member States and monitor the implementation of Europe 2020, the employment rate in the age groups 15- 64 and 20-64 was also monitored.
1 The proportion of the number of employed people in the population aged 15 and over.
4
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
EMPLOYMENT
In 2013 its value for the age group 15-64 was 59.5%, representing an annual growth of 0.7 pp.

According to latest Eurostat2 data for 2013, the employment rate of the population aged 15- 64 in the EU28 was 64.1% (compared to 64.2% in 2012).


The employment rate of the age group 20-64 (according to the LFS of the NSI) in 2013 was 63.5%, or 0.5 pp higher than the year before, regardless of the decline in the number of the employed in this group. The reason for the increased employment rate, given the parallel decrease in the number of the employed, lay in the higher rate of population decline compared to the rate of decline in the number of the employed. The trends in the age group 15-64 were analogous.

2 Eurostat conducts LFS four times per year, where each covers one quarter of the year.
5
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
UNEMPLOYMENT
In 2013 the labour market continued to evolve under the consequences of the global financial and economic crisis, the influence of the seasonal factor, and the systematic action of the National Employment Agency (NEA) to balance the supply and demand of labour. The processes in the labour market were monitored, controlled and balanced through active policies and job-broking, thus preventing any sharp increase in unemployment. The number of people who started work in 2013 and their share in the outflow both increased compared to the previous year.

The main inflow of unemployed to labour offices continued to consist of employed periodically being dismissed without collective redundancy procedure, mostly from small and medium-sized enterprises due to the shrinking of the national and European markets and the reduced workloads in some economic activities. At the same time, the number and the proportion of people dismissed from the real economy both dropped. The result of these processes was reduced growth in the number of unemployed and partial compensation for the number of people dismissed from schemes under the Human Resources Development Operational Programme (HRD OP). Compared to the previous year, the increase in the inflow in 2013 was insignificant in spite of the dismissal of nearly 50 thousand people from HRD OP schemes.

In 2013, despite the persisting increase in unemployment, some processes indicative of some stabilisation of the labour market could be observed. The year saw the lowest growth in unemployment rate since the beginning of the crisis. Moreover, unemployment in 2013 bore the features of structural unemployment. There were large groups of unemployed not included in the labour market, as well as a mismatch between employers’ demand for workforce with specific skills and the qualifications of the unemployed registered at the labour offices. This could be easily explained with the help of the Beveridge curve, where an increase in unemployment, accompanied by a parallel increase in job vacancies, suggests structural problems in the labour market.

The growth in the average monthly unemployment rate was insignificant (0.2 pp), and the growth in the average monthly number of unemployed was by 6900, compared to 32 thousand in 2012. At the same time, the number of unemployed at the end of December 2013 was about 5500 less that in January of the same year, as opposed to 2012, when December saw almost 9800 more unemployed over January. A positive sign in 2013 was the decline in the numbers of: unemployed young people aged 24- 29; unemployed professionals, including professionals with higher education; unemployed with lower secondary education; long-term (for more than 2 years) unemployed; and the unemployed in the age groups 45-49 and 50-54.
6
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
UNEMPLOYMENT
The administrative statistics of the National Employment Agency in the period 2001-2008 showed a lasting decrease in the number of people registered at labour offices. This was conditioned by the macroeconomic stability, the persisting positive trend of rapid economic growth, and significant investment in the country. The period was further characterised by a steady decline in unemployment and growth in employment. In the next period, 2009-2013, resulting from the global financial and economic crisis, a reversal of trends accounted for growth in the average monthly unemployment rate for five consecutive ears. The average monthly unemployment rate in the period 2011-2013 was calculated on the basis of the new number of the economically active population in accordance with the February 2011 census. The latter numbered 421 596 less the number of the economically active population in accordance with the March 2001 census, being the basis of calculation for the unemployment rate in the period 2001-2010. For this reason, despite the smaller number of unemployed people in 2011 over 2010, the unemployment rate was still higher.

In 2013 the average monthly number of unemployed registered at labour offices was 371 380, or by 6843 (1.9%) more than the previous year. Monthly unemployment fluctuation in 2013 remained relatively low and almost constant, with just a minimum average monthly decline of -0.1%, compared to the average monthly growth of 0.2% in 2012.
7
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
UNEMPLOYMENT

In 2013 there was a parallel increase in both the inflow and outflow of unemployed at labour offices, with an almost nine-fold increase in the outflow compared to 2012.

8
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
UNEMPLOYMENT
The inflow of unemployed at labour offices in 2013 comprised 498 942 newly registered and people with renewed registration. The inflow increased very slightly over 2012, by just 2924 people.

The number of newly registered1 unemployed people at labour offices was 475 838, which remained unchanged over the previous year, with just one person more.

23 102 unemployed renewed their registration in 2013, representing an increase by 2923 people (14.5%) compared to the previous year.

As regards the breakdown by main economic sector of the people dismissed from the economy in 2013, the largest proportion among the newly registered unemployed was that of workers dismissed from the services sector: 45.7% (compared to 41.6% in 2012). The proportion of the newly registered unemployed from the industry sector was 17.8% (compared to 18.6% in 2012), and the proportion of unemployed workers from the agricultural sector remained unchanged from the previous year at 3.3%. The proportion of newly registered unemployed with no specified sector of dismissal or people having completed a certain degree continued to decline significantly in 2013: 33.2% (compared to 36.5% in 2012).

Based on economic activity the proportion of newly registered unemployed people in 2013 was highest among the dismissed from the general government sector: 15.3% (compared to 11.0% in 2012), followed by wholesale and retail trade: 12.5% (compared to 13.1% in 2012), and manufacturing: 12.5% (compared to 13.1% in 2012).

In 2013 the structure of the newly registered unemployed at labour offices by reason for dismissal was as follows:

  • The share of newly registered unemployed from the real economy having been dismissed due to redundancies or resignation continued to dominate, despite significantly shrinking to 47.4% in 2013 (compared to 52.5% in 2012).
1Newly registered unemployed people were mostly workers having been dismissed from small and medium-sized companies, mainly in the services and industry sector, for which a notification of collective redundancies had been submitted, as well as people having left by mutual consent. Part of the newly registered unemployed were people whose mandatory six-month period after termination of the labour office registration had expired in accordance with the EPA. People not entitled to financial compensation also registered at labour offices in order to certify their status as “unemployed” and qualify for inclusion in employment programmes and measures, training courses, employment and training courses under HRD OP schemes, or receive social benefits, child allowances, study scholarships etc.
9
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
UNEMPLOYMENT
  • The share of newly registered people at labour offices who used to be inactive (discouraged people, people having worked in the grey economy, people having completed their education etc.) dropped from 16.7% in 2012 to 16.4% in 2013.
  • The share of registered people with expired contracts under employment programmes and measures grew significantly, from 8.0% in 2012 to 13.5% in 2013.
  • The share of unemployed people having registered in order to use the services of other institutions (to obtain SAD, health and other certificates; as proof of unemployed status required by financial and educational institutions) was 12.7% (compared to 12.8% in 2012).
  • The share of people having registered after expiry of the mandatory six-month period since termination of the previous registration grew slightly to 3.8% (compared to 3.7% in 2012).
  • The share of registered people having worked in other regions of the country shrank to 3.6% (compared to 4.0% in 2012).
  • The share of registered people having worked abroad grew from 1.6% in 2012 to 2.1% in 2013.
  • The share of people having been dismissed from work as a result of collective redundancies continued to decrease, from 0.6% in 2012 to 0.4% 2013.
The outflow in 2013 comprised 488 535 people, representing a rise by 25 865 people (or 5.6%) over 2012.

The people having started work who were part of the outflow numbered 249 720, representing a rise by 25 038, or 11.1%, compared to the previous year. This was the main cause of the growth in the outflow observed throughout the year. The share of this group in the outflow continued to grow to 51.1% (compared to 48.6% in 2012).

For various reasons in 2013 238 815 people had their labour office registrations discontinued. This group also increased in number over the previous year, however by just 827 people (or 0.3%), and its share in the outflow continued to decline, by 2.5 pp (from 51.4% in 2012 to 48.9% in 2013).

The average annual unemployment rate in the country in 2013 was 11.3%. This was lower (by 1.1 pp) than the targeted rate of 12.4% in the National Action Plan for Employment (NAPE). The average monthly rate increased slightly over 2012, by 0.2 pp.
10
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
UNEMPLOYMENT


In 2013 the unemployment rate in the country decreased gradually from 11.9% in January and 12.0% in February to 10.7% in August (except July, when there was a slight increase of 0.1 pp). In the following months the unemployment rate increased once more, reaching 11.8% in December, which, however, was still lower than at the start of the year.

According to Eurostat data, in 2013 the average monthly unemployment rate in the EU28 was 10.8%, and average monthly unemployment rate in the Eurozone was 12.0% (higher by 1.2 pp). Based on data of the NSI Labour Force Survey submitted to Eurostat, the average unemployment rate in Bulgaria in the same period was 13.0%, which was 2.2 pp higher than the average EU rate.
11
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
UNEMPLOYMENT
In Bulgaria in 2013 the average unemployment rate by region continued to vary widely.


In 2013 the average monthly unemployment rate continued to vary widely between municipalities in Bulgaria – from 4.5% in Bozhurishte Municipality to 60.4% in Ruzhintsi Municipality (Vidin region). However, the scope of variation dropped significantly over the previous year by 7.7 pp to 55.9 pp (the difference between the municipalities of Ruzhintsi and Bozhurishte in 2012 was 63.6 pp).
12
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
UNEMPLOYMENT

The Employment Promotion Act (EPA) entitles employed people, students and pensioners to register at a labour office as active jobseekers. In 2013 labour offices registered on average a total of 6997 jobseekers per month (compared to 6394 in 2012). The number of registered jobseekers in 2013 who were currently in employment was 3326 (compared to 3077 in 2012), of those in education – 1051 (compared to 898 in 2012), and in retirement – 2620 (compared to 2419 in 2012).

Main structures of the unemployed

The age, gender, professional qualification and educational attainment of the unemployed are essential for their advancement in the labour market.

Based on aggregated data of the Employment Agency, the profile of the average unemployed registered at a labour office in Bulgaria in 2013 was as follows: an unemployed person with no qualification and specialty (55.2%), who for the most part has a low educational attainment, i.e. lower secondary and lower education (84.7%), and is more likely to be a female (56.5%) aged over 45 (44.3%). At the same time, 42.8% of females with no qualification and specialty were long-term unemployed having been registered at a labour office for more than one year.
13
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
UNEMPLOYMENT
In 2013 the average monthly number of unemployed females was 200 817, or by 1835 higher than in 2012. The average monthly rate (the monthly dynamics) of this group was negative: -0.2% (compared to the positive rate of 0.4% in 2012). Unemployed females retained their dominant share in the total number of unemployed registered at labour offices, which, compared to 2012 dropped by 0.5 pp. The female/male ratio was 54.1%:45.9% (compared to 54.6%:45.4% in 2012).

In the period 2008-2013 the share of females in the total number of unemployed dropped by 8.4 pp, from 62.5% in 2008 to 54.1% in 2013. It follows that the crisis has had a more adverse impact on male employment.

The group of unemployed males registered at labour offices in 2013 also tended to increase, however at a far greater rate than the group of unemployed females, by 3.0% (or 5007 people). Their average monthly number was 170 563 and their average monthly growth rate was zero, just like in 2012.

The ageing of the population that has been observed for the past 25 years in Bulgaria has had a direct and significant impact on the age structure of the unemployed and has resulted in retaining and affirming the persisting trend for age groups over 50 to become the most numerous ones. The administrative statistics of NEA in 2013 reported an increase in the average monthly number of the unemployed across five age groups. The increase in the age group 40-44 (by 380) and in the group of young people aged 25-29 (by 493) was significantly less than in the other three groups, which increased as follows: the age group 30-34 by 715; the age group 35-39 by 1400; and, most significantly, the age group over 55 by 4733 people.

The structure of the unemployed by occupation comprised three main occupational groups: unemployed with workers’ specialty, unemployed professionals, and unemployed without specialty.

The average monthly number of unemployed professionals dropped by 2676 (by 3.5%) and their group comprised of 74752 people. The average monthly rate (the monthly dynamics) of this group was negative: -0.8% (compared to the positive rate of 0.2% in 2012). The proportion of unemployed professionals decreased from 21.2% in 2012 to 20.1% in 2013.
14
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
UNEMPLOYMENT

The biggest increase was observed in the group of unemployed people with workers’ specialty registered at labour offices: 8.4% (7067 people), with a total number of 91 541. Likewise, the group had the highest average monthly growth rate (monthly dynamics): 0.6% (with the same rate of 0.6% in 2012). In the course of the year their share increased by 1.4 pp to 24.6%.

In 2013 the largest group in the occupational structure of the unemployed continued to be that of unemployed without qualification and specialty. It comprised 205 087 people, or 2452 people (1.2%) more than the previous year. The average monthly rate was negative: -0.2% (compared to the slight positive rate of 0.1% in 2012). The unemployed without qualification and specialty retained the highest proportion in the occupational structure of the unemployed and their share continued to decline in 2013, by 0.4 pp to 55.2%. Almost all the unemployed without qualification and specialty had low educational attainment, i.e. lower secondary and lower education, and their proportion continued to increase to 84.7% (compared to 84.3% in 2012).

The European and global financial and economic crisis over the past five years has had an adverse effect on the educational structure of the unemployed. Its impact was strongest
15
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
UNEMPLOYMENT
and particularly severe on the group of the most educated unemployed, who are also the best qualified among all unemployed, namely people with specialised secondary and vocational education, and people with higher education.

In 2013 the number and the proportion of the group of the unemployed with specialised secondary and vocational education continued to grow at the highest rate: by 6172 people (5.4%), resulting in an average monthly number of 121 027. The average monthly rate was positive: 0.3% (compared to the positive rate of 0.6% in 2012). This was the highest rate in the educational structure of the unemployed, as well as the only one to have a positive value. In the course of the year the proportion of the unemployed with specialised secondary and vocational education increased from 31.5% (2012) to 32.6% (2013).

The group of the unemployed with higher education in 2013 showed positive change in terms of both average monthly number and share. The number of the unemployed with higher education dropped by 1185 (3.1%), resulting in a total of 37 503 people. The average monthly rate of the group was negative: -0.6% (compared to the positive rate of 0.4% in 2012). There was similarly a drop in their share by 0.5 pp, from 10.6% in 2012 to 10.1% in 2013.

16
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
UNEMPLOYMENT
The average monthly number of the unemployed with general secondary education was 37 249. In the course of the year their number decreased by 316. The average monthly rate of the group was negative: -0.5% (compared to the positive rate of 0.3% in 2012). There was similarly a drop in their share compared to 2012 of 0.3 pp, resulting in an end share of 10.0%.

The number of the unemployed with lower secondary education was 68 015, which was 551 (0.8%) less their number in 2012. Their share also decreased compared to the previous year, from 18.8% (2012) to 18.3% (2013).

The number of the unemployed with primary and lower education was 107 586. In the course of the year their number increased by 2722 or by 2.6%. There was also a slight increase in their share, totalling 29.0% (compared to 28.8% in 2012).

A large part of the employment and training programmes and measures implemented by the National Employment Agency with state budget funding, as well as projects and schemes under the Human Resources Development Operational Programme target the unemployed with lower secondary education and lower education, people without qualification and specialty, and illiterate people aiming to improve their employability and increase their chances in the labour market.

Unemployed from disadvantaged groups
Unemployed young people aged up to 24 and 29

In the course of the past two years the national initiative “Jobs for Young People in Bulgaria” was being implemented. In 2013 the two groups of unemployed youth show trends of reduction.

The group of unemployed young people aged up to 24 in 2013 numbered 35 286 people on average per month, representing a reduction of 553 people over the previous year. The share of unemployed young people aged up to 24 in the total number of the unemployed also decreased, from 9.8% in 2012 to 9.5% in 2013. The lasting trend of unemployed young people without qualification and unemployed young people with lower secondary education and lower education having the highest share among unemployed youths aged up to 24 was retained, their respective shares being 63.5% (compared to 64.0% in 2012) and 48.8% (compared to 48.1% in 2012), where the latter group showed a rise over the previous year. Unemployed young people aged up to 24 with higher education in 2013 amounted to 6.3% (compared to 6.3% in 2012) of all the unemployed with higher education registered at labour offices and 6.7% (compared to 6.8% in 2012) of all registered young people aged up to 24.
17
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
UNEMPLOYMENT
The share of long-term unemployed young people aged up to 24 who had been out of work for more than one year increased to 19.3% (compared to 18.8% in 2012) of all registered young people aged up to 24.

According to Eurostat data, in 2013 the average monthly rate of youth unemployment for the group aged up to 24 in Bulgaria was 28.6%, or 5.1 pp higher than the average EU rate of 23.5%.

The group of unemployed young people aged up to 29 in 2013 numbered 74 720 people on average per month, showing a slight reduction of 59 people over the previous year. The share of unemployed young people aged up to 29 in the total number of the unemployed also decreased, from 20.5% in 2012 to 20.1% in 2013. At the same time, the share of young people having started employment in 2013 in the total number of unemployed people having started employment was higher: 24.8%. The lasting trend of unemployed young people without qualification and unemployed young people with lower secondary education and lower education having the highest share was retained, their respective shares being 60.4% (compared to 60.8% in 2012) and 46.9% (compared to 46.7% in 2012), where the latter group showed a slight rise of 0.2 pp over the previous year. Unemployed young people aged up to 29 with higher education in 2013 amounted to 23.6% (compared to 23.1% in 2012) of all unemployed people with higher education registered at labour offices and 11.8% (compared to 11.9% in 2012) of all registered young people aged up to 29. The share of long-term unemployed young people aged up to 29 who had been out of work for more than one year increased to 22.4% (compared to 22.0% in 2012) of all registered young people aged up to 29.

In 2013 the number of the unemployed aged over 50 was 133 021, representing a growth of 4584 (3.6%) over the previous year. After four consecutive years of decrease, the share of people over 50 in the total number of the unemployed in the country increased from 35.2% in 2012 to 35.8% in 2013. The lasting trend of people without qualification and people with lower secondary education and lower education having the highest share among unemployed people over 50 was retained, their respective shares being 52.0% (compared to 53.6% in 2012) and 47.5% (compared to 49.3% in 2012). A positive fact was that in 2013 both sub-groups had significantly lower shares.

The number of the long-term unemployed who had spent more than one year at a labour office in 2013 was 122 738 on average per month. This showed an increase of 3906 people (3.3%) over the previous year. Their share also increased, from 32.6% in 2012 to 33.0% in 2013.
18
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
UNEMPLOYMENT
In 2013 there was a drop in the share of the group of the long-term unemployed who had been out of work for more than two years in the total number of people who had been registered at a labour office for more than one year.

The average length of stay at a labour office for unemployed people in 2013 increased slightly over the previous year, by 0.4 months and become 7.3 months. Countrywide, unemployment remained relatively short-term (just over six months).

Average duration of unemployment in months

The number of the unemployed with permanent disabilities was 15 670, representing an increase of 570 people, or 3.8%. At the same time, their share in the labour market also rose slightly, from 4.1% in 2012 to 4.2% in 2013.
19
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
LABOUR DEMAND IN 2013

LABOUR DEMAND IN 2013

In 2013 labour offices experienced an increased demand for labour in the real economy. Starting in 2011 the primary market showed a slight increase in the number of announced job vacancies at labour offices, which peaked in 2013, however, their number was still lower than in 2009. Some gradual stabilisation was observed, but it was too early to talk of a steady trend of recovery. The monthly dynamics in the course of the year were positive, showing signs of growth throughout the entire year except May.

In 2013 a total of 215 706 job vacancies were announced at the labour offices. Compared to 2012, this meant 29 394 (11.3%) fewer job vacancies. This reduction was a result of the smaller number of jobs under the HRD OP due to the completion of the implementation of some schemes. This was partially offset by the increase in job vacancies under employment programmes and measures and the registered recovery in the real economy.

The structure of the job vacancies announced at labour offices showed that the majority of jobs (64.4%) were in the primary market, nearly a quarter (24.8%) were under employment programmes, almost 6% were under the HRD OP, and 5% were under employment promotion measures provided for in the EPA.

20
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
LABOUR DEMAND IN 2013
A total of 138 915 job vacancies in the primary market were posted, which was the highest number of announced job vacancies since 2010. Compared to 2012, this meant 11 772 (9.3%) more job vacancies. Labour demand in the real economy was a priority for labour offices. Its share remained high and grew by 12.5 pp over the previous year. The monthly dynamics of the primary labour market were analogous to 2012 and more or less followed the typical annual fluctuation. There was a shift in the months of peak labour demand. The highest number of job vacancies in 2013 were posted in April and March in connection with the supply of seasonal employment, as well as in September in connection with the beginning of the school year. Every single month of 2013 saw a rise compared to the corresponding month in 2012 except for May.

The analysis of job vacancies announced in the real economy broken down by economic activity shows that the areas that traditionally have the highest number of job vacancies did not change. Manufacturing provided the highest number of job vacancies: 34 476. It was followed by wholesale and retail trade and repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles with 19 481 job vacancies, and the accommodation and food service activities with 11 912 job vacancies.

The other sectors were agriculture (9214 job vacancies), general government (8984 job vacancies), administrative and support service activities (8285 job vacancies), construction (8101 job vacancies), education (6744 job vacancies), real estate operations (6101 job vacancies), financial and insurance activities (5681 job vacancies), transportation (5618 job vacancies) etc.
21
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
LABOUR DEMAND IN 2013
More significant increase in demand was observed in the field of general government (with 4024 more job vacancies announced compared to 2012), followed by manufacturing (3793 job vacancies) and the accommodation and food service activities (2094 job vacancies). Decreased demand was observed in the following seven sectors: transportation and storage (504 job vacancies), human health and social work activities (299 job vacancies), administrative and support service activities (272 job vacancies), agriculture (173 job vacancies), education (77 job vacancies), mining and quarrying (60 job vacancies), and production of electricity and heat (13 job vacancies).

A review of announced job vacancies by occupation in the primary market shows that, as in previous years, most demanded at labour offices were workers for the clothing and textile sector – tailors, machine operators in the clothing and textile sector etc. – with more than 12 000 job vacancies, and sellers in shops and markets, as well as trade and sales negotiators with more than 11 800 job vacancies. Throughout the whole year there was increased interest in teachers in primary, lower secondary education and secondary schools and vocational training teachers – almost 9700 job vacancies. Demand was consistently high for manufacturing workers – almost 8200 job vacancies for workers in agriculture, forestry and fishing, gardeners and growers, stockbreeders etc. – over 8100 job vacancies. There was high supply of job vacancies for personal care workers in health and childcare services – nearly 6000 job vacancies.

The established trend for the majority (62.6%) of announced job vacancies being requested by private employers was also evident in 2013. The number of job vacancies increased by 4124, totalling 86 928, but there was a decrease of 2.6 pp in their share.

8081 new job vacancies in the primary market were posted by labour offices. For each one hundred job vacancies in the primary market posted, there were six newly opened ones. A total of 1056 more job vacancies were reported.

The seasonal factor remained one of the determinants of labour demand. A total of 14 491 seasonal job vacancies were posted in the course of the year, which was almost the same as in 2012, with just 110 job vacancies (0.8%) more.

In 2013 there was a significant rise in the demand for workers from all professional and qualification groups (professionals, workers, unskilled labour). In terms of quantity, the economy generated more jobs for the lower and medium tiers and fewer for the highly-qualified ones.
22
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
LABOUR DEMAND IN 2013
In terms of the professional and qualification aspect, the primary market retained its priority demand for unskilled labour from labour offices through a total of 100 695 job vacancies, representing an increase of 9642 job vacancies over the previous year. These job vacancies constituted the majority (72.5%) of the total number of job vacancies announced in the real economy. There was an increase of 0.9 pp in the share of vacancies for jobseekers without qualification and with lower educational attainment. The primary market had use mostly for unskilled labour. The seasonal factor was decisive for the demand for workers without specialty and profession. Demand levels peaked in April and March, when the preparation of the summer season was at its most intense. The end of the year experienced a drop in job vacancies for unskilled labour, which is typical for December. The unemployed without specialty constituted one of the target groups of subsidised employment. This maintained intense demand rates for such labour through labour offices during most of the year.

There was a partial disbalance between the professional and qualification structure of registered unemployed people and the demand for labour with particular characteristics. The common feature between the two structures is the dominant share of unskilled workers and the priority demand for unskilled labour. Disbalances could be observed in the structure of registered professionals and the demand for workers with different specialties and skills, as well as in the supply and demand for labour with workers’ professions. Furthermore, a shortage of specific categories of workers having specific qualification and skills was observed.

The second largest group of announced job vacancies was for professionals, comprising 22 409 job vacancies, which was 377 less than the previous year. Their share was 16.1%. In the course of the year there was higher demand for professionals with higher education than with secondary vocational education. The demand for unemployed people with workers’ professions was also conditioned by the seasonal factor. A total of 15 811 job vacancies were announced, which was 2507 more than the previous year. Their share rose by 0.9 pp, reaching 11.4%. The number of job vacancies for workers naturally peaked in April (2474 job vacancies) and March (1993 job vacancies) and slumped in December (697 job vacancies). In the active season there was increased demand for workers with professions in the field of agriculture and the related manufacturing, construction, tourism etc.

In 2013 the announced job vacancies under measures provided for in the EPA totalled 10 753, 2.5 times more than the previous year. The growth was more intense at the time of their launch in April and May, as well as in September and October. A major part of the job vacancies under measures (62.3% or 6701 job vacancies) were from the private sector.
23
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
LABOUR DEMAND IN 2013
In 2013 a total of 53 513 job vacancies were announced under employment programmes, or 22 703 more than 2012. Jobs under the national programme “From Social Assistance to Employment” continued to have the highest number and share: 38 747 jobs, respectively 72.4% in the structure of jobs under employment programmes. These were followed by the second largest national programme “Assistants to People with Disabilities”with a total of 4581 jobs, or 434 more jobs. Their share was 8.4% of all jobs under programmes.

A total of 12 525 job vacancies were announced under the Human Resources Development Operational Programme, which represented a decrease of 6.6 times (by 70 310 jobs). The reason lay in the specificity of the technological cycle of the implementation of HRD OP schemes. The most active period of the programme implementation was 2012, when a maximum number of people were included in schemes and maximum use was made of the resources of the European Social Fund to mitigate the negative impacts of the crisis. In 2013 the number of people included in schemes under the programme, as well as the number of announced job vacancies decreased. The demand for labour under the scheme “Support for employment” had a decisive role in 2013 demand, as it accounted for more than two thirds of announced job vacancies (a total of 8378 jobs) under the HRD OP during the year.

The overall growth in job vacancies in the primary market announced at labour offices impacted occupied jobs and conditioned the increase observed in the course of the year. The growth was due to the hard work and established good communication between job brokers and employers.

During the year a total of 113 533 jobs were occupied in the primary market, which was 18 578 (17.8%) more than in 2012.

The data show that occupied job vacancies in the primary market increased at a faster rate than announced job vacancies, i.e. job vacancies from previous periods were actively being occupied, which was another reflection of the disbalance between supply and demand. The seasonal factor, the start of the school year and periods of very limited labour demand acted as facilitators to reduce the gap between labour supply and demand. The announcement of a large number of seasonal job vacancies in March and April increased the quantitative disbalance between supply and demand as many seasonal jobs vacancies were announced which were occupied in the following months. June and July values were relatively close as a result of active recruitment for seasonally-based activities. In September there was also proximity of values due to the start of the school year and the occupation of teaching jobs vacancies announced in August.
24
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
LABOUR DEMAND IN 2013
In the period October-December occupied jobs were more or equal in number to announced job vacancies because of the limited labour demand. At the end of the year the labour market shrank significantly and the number of occupied jobs was higher or equal to the number of announced job vacancies because of the occupation of jobs announced in previous months.

An increasing part of employers bring up labour shortages as a key business problem. There are significant difficulties to find suitable staff despite the high supply of labour. This is due to the rapidly changing business needs, as well as the fact that workers’ skills cannot adequately respond to labour market dynamics.
25
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
JOB-BROKING SERVICES

JOB-BROKING SERVICES

The job-broking is the main tool to reduce unemployment and increase employment. Improving the efficiency of job-broking by means of modernising the employment services offered, expanding their scope and strengthening the individual approach while working with the unemployed is an important prerequisite to optimise the labour market situation.

In order to balance the negative processes on the labour market, the National Employment Agency encouraged opening of more job vacancies and occupying most of these in shortest periods. This resulted in placing in employment 25 038 unemployed (11.1%) more over the year compared to 2012. A total of 249 720 unemployed started work in the primary labour market, in employment programmes, under HRD OP schemes and in employment promotion measures provided for in the EPA.


In the conditions of enhanced economic situation, dynamic labour market with widened coverage of unemployed from the disadvantaged groups and for a third consecutive year growing number of unemployed placed at work, the economy demonstrated indications for recovery and gradual revival, even though with a minimum economic growth.
26
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
JOB-BROKING SERVICES
The main determinants of the dynamics in the structure of people placed in employment over the year were the seasonal factor and the active employment policy interventions. The months with the highest number of unemployed placed in subsidised employment matched the months which registered growth in the placement of low-skilled unemployed, precisely due the fact that they were the target of the active employment policy and there was a demand for this group for seasonal employment. Those with higher qualification on the other hand found better employment in the beginning of the active summer season and in September and October due to the start of the new school year.
The characteristics of the people who started work in 2013 were the following:

  • 141 399 were women, who were both traditionally over the years the dominant group in the structure in terms of gender, and the prevailing group in the structure of the registered unemployed by gender. They accounted for 56.6% versus 54.6% in 2012.
  • 105 056 was the number of the unemployed without qualification, who continue to form the biggest group in the occupational structure of the people who started work. Their number increased by 14 221 individuals (15.7%). Their share also increased – by 1.6 percent points, up to 42.1% in 2013. The prevailing part (72.7% – 76 417 unemployed) were with lower secondary education or lower education, most of them 51.1% (39 024 unemployed) had started work after having been placed in subsidised employment.
  • 74 704 was the number of the unemployed with a speciality. Despite their growth by 5991 (8.7%), their share decreased from 30.6% in 2012 to 29.9% in 2013. The tendency that the professionals with technical education who were 29.2% (21 820 people) perform best on the labour market was once again reconfirmed. Professionals with economic and legal education were the second group demanded with priority at the labour offices – 25.5% (19 063 people). Third ranked the professionals in the field of services – 22.9% (17 133 people). Lower performance on the labour market showed the professionals in the field of education – 6.3% (4719 people), in agriculture – 5.7% (4281 people), in the humanities – 4.5% (3369 people), etc.;
  • 69 960 were the unemployed with workers’ occupation, who in absolute terms increased by 4826 people (7.4%), while their share which was 28%, decreased by 1 percentage point.;
  • 62 006 were the young people aged up to 29. Their number grew by 5779 (15.3%), and their share (24.8%) of the total number of people who started work showed a small decrease – by 0.2 pp.
  • 54 441 were the long-term unemployed (people registered at the labour offices longer than one year) and they represented 21.8% of all people placed in employment over the year. They grew both in number and as a share respectively by 10 726 people (24.5%) and by 2.3 pp;
27
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
JOB-BROKING SERVICES
  • 41 714 were the unemployed with higher education or by 3307 people (8.6%) more compared to 2012. Their share in the structure or those who started work was 16.7%, compared to 17.1% in the preceding year;
  • 7515 unemployed were people with disabilities, by 2013 people (36.6%) more. The share of this group of unemployed was 3%, compared to 2.4% in 2012.
The active and effective job-broking on the primary labour market implemented by the NEA had a decisive impact on curbing the unemployment in the country. 167 320 unemployed were placed in the real economy over the year, including those who were provided with services encouraging them to be more active on the labour market and respectively resulted in their employment. They were by 15 474 people (10.2%) more compared to 2012. Their share – 67% of the total number of people who started work over the year, declined by 0.6 pp.


The active work of the job brokers who focused their efforts to placing a maximum number of unemployed lead to a positive balance in the monthly dynamics on the primary market thus marking a steady process of more explicit growth, with higher values registered in any month of 2013 compared to 2012. The highest growth was registered in the months of February and April, respectively by 3238 and 2839 people more, and the lowest increase was observed in March – by 458 people more and in May – by 297 people more.
28
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
JOB-BROKING SERVICES
Job brokers promptly and efficiently referred the unemployed from the disadvantaged groups to subsidised employment, with a view to their integration on the labour market and not allowing them to fall under the poverty line. Over the year in active employment programmes, employment promotion measures under the EPA and under the HRD OP schemes were included 82 400 unemployed or by 9564 people (13.1%) more compared to the preceding year. They represented one third (33%) of all placed in work, compared to 32.4% in the preceding year.


The National Employment Agency, as the main job broker implemented active policy prioritising the support to the social-economic integration of the ethnic minorities and other disadvantaged groups on the labour market. One of the most vulnerable groups on the labour market is the group of unemployed Roma. Their integration is related to solving the problem with the high unemployment rate among them, the main reasons being their low education and qualification level; hence their limited chances on the labour market. While implementing the National Action Plan under the international initiative Decade of Roma Inclusion 2005-2015, and the National Strategy of Republic of Bulgaria for Roma Integration 2012-2020, the National Employment Agency over the year included 24 608 Roma in total in different activities under the Plan.
29
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
JOB-BROKING SERVICES
Out of them placed in employment were 14 670 unemployed Roma, of whom:

  • 10 382 (70.8%) were included in various employment programmes and projects with the prevailing part of them (78.1% – 8110 Roma) being included in the national programme “From Social Assistance to Employment” and other 14.9% (1543 people) included in HRD OP schemes;
  • 3979 (27.1%) Rome were placed in employment on the primary labour market;
  • 309 (2.1%) in employment promotion measures under the EPA;
  • 9928 people were included in activities for improving their employability and in vocational training, as follows:
      – 5461 people in motivation for active job search;
      – 3698 people in vocational guidance trainings;
      – 414 people in vocational training;
      – 231 people in key competencies training;
      – 124 people in literacy training;
3 people were included in motivation training for entrepreneurship promotion; in training for starting and managing their own business – 7 people, of whom 3 under the HRD OP.

With regards to promoting the social and civil dialogue of the Roma unemployed 104 local meeting were organised between the Labour Office Directorates (LODs) and Roma NGOs over the year. The work of the job brokers since 2008 has been supported by Roma representatives, who were trained and employed by the LODs as “job brokers – Roma mediators” under the national programme “To Activate the Inactive Persons”. At the end of 2013 there were 76 Roma mediators working in 63 LODs. The implementation of the programme and the activity of the mediators resulted by the end of the year in 12 993 inactive and discouraged people registered at the LODs. Out of them 3434 people were placed in employment, and 117 people were included in different trainings.

For eight year now the National Employment Agency has been organising job fairs in the country, aimed at reducing the level of unemployment and activating the work of the LODs with the employers for announcing more job vacancies and increasing the number of people who have started work on the primary labour market. In 2013 the National Employment Agency organised and conducted 122 job fairs in the country (96 of which were under “ Let’s be Successful Together” project under the HRD OP) – 69 general and 53 specialised. Out of the specialised job fairs 44 were for young people under the National Initiative “Jobs for Young People in Bulgaria 2012-2013”, 7 job fairs were for long term unemployed and people over 50, and 2 job fairs were aimed at the Roma community representatives.
30
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
JOB-BROKING SERVICES
The job fairs were attended by 21 453 job seekers and 1694 employers who announced 11 549 job vacancies. The number of the people who had started work was10 637, with 7444 of them registered as unemployed at the LODs. The occupancy of the job vacancies was 92.1%, which was an efficiency indicator for the job fairs.

The 44 job fairs for young people were attended by 6914 young people and 667 employers, who announced 4512 job vacancies. The number of young people who have started work was 4361 (96.6% occupancy of job vacancies), with 3115 of them registered at the LODs. The National Employment Agency provides job-broking services also to foreign nationals, registered at the LODs. As of 31.12.2013, their number was 958. They came from 38 countries, with most of them from Russia – 684 people and Ukraine – 113 people. Since the beginning the year the number of people who had started work had been 312, out of them 227 were placed in employment with the assistance of the LODs. 13 people were included in training.

With the aim for expanding and improving the scope of the employment services offered, the unity of action between the state and the private institutions offering such services strengthened. In 2013 continued the activity that started in 2009 for singing agreements for cooperation and joint activities between the private employment agencies and the territorial units of the NEA, with some 59 agreements signed as of 31.12.2013. They create conditions for exchange of information about job vacancies, sharing of experience and good practices.

Furthermore in 2013 were signed agreements with eight temporary work agencies. In 2013 some 1344 unemployed registered at the LODs were placed in employment via these agencies.

In the period continued the development of the single portal for the job vacancies announced across the country and by 31.12.2013 33 job brokers provided links via the NEA website to their electronic registers of available job vacancies. The development of a subsystem for the job brokers who do not have electronic registers of available job vacancies is planned to secure registration in the “e-job fair” on the NEA website.
31
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
ACTIVE POLICIES OF THE LABOUR MARKET

ACTIVE POLICIES OF THE LABOUR MARKET

Implementation of the active labour market policy financed through the state budget and the European Social Fund under the Human Resources Development Operational Programme.

The active labour market policy initiatives implemented by the NEA have a direct impact on the situation of the national labour market and help reducing unemployment. The active labour market policy initiatives balance the labour market disbalance in periods of weak demand for seasonal labour in the real economy when the subsidised employment is the tool for providing employment to the unemployed, especially those from the disadvantaged groups on the labour market.

The active labour market policy initiatives are financed by the state budget, and by the European Social Fund (ESF) via the implementation of the Human Resources Development Operational Programme (HRD OP). In 2013 both the amount of the provided financial resources and the number of the unemployed and employed covered by the active labour market policy initiatives increased.

The activities for implementing the active policy contribute also for improving the employment opportunities of the labour force, for encouraging the entrepreneurship, economic initiative and adaptation of the labour force to the changing labour market situation, for limiting the poverty and overcoming the social exclusion.
The proportion in the distribution of the finances spent for the different initiatives in the recent years shows the tendency of steady growth of the ESF financing, the share of which for 2013 amounted to 78.7% of all funds for active policy over the year (2009: 5.0%; 2010: 35.0%; 2011: 57.5%; 2012: 72.3%). The sharply decreasing amount, and hence the relative share of funds for training referred to in art. 63 of the Employment Promotion Act are compensated with the activities under the Operational Programme, the majority of which are designated to training of unemployed and employed.
In 2013 the total amount of finances spent for active policy was BGN 394 726.0 thousand, including BGN 84 208.2 thousand from the state budget for implementing programmes, promotion measures and training (under art. 63 of the EPA) and BGN 310 517.8 thousand from the ESF for implementing the schemes of the Human Resources Development Operational Programme. The amount was by BGN 174 266.4 thousand (79.0%) higher than the finances spent in the preceding year, with growing amount of financing invested from the state budget (in April with a Decision No.224 of the CoM additional BGN 30.6 mln. were allocated to subsidised employment under the NAPE 2013), as well as growing amount of the financing under the HRD OP.
32
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
ACTIVE POLICIES OF THE LABOUR MARKET

The total number of the unemployed and employed included in training and placed in employment in 2013 was 172 389 (under programmes and promotion measures financed by the state budget, incl. training referred to in art. 63 of the EPA, and under the HRD OP schemes, financed by the ESF).

When comparing the amount of funds spent for active policy and the number of the people covered by the initiatives (Fig. 3), one can observe a significant growth in the volume of funding in 2013 and a slight decrease of the number of people included in programmes, promotion measures and HRD OP compared to the previous year. This is the effect of the specific payment mechanism with vouchers (the amounts were paid to the training institutions at a later stage, after the training was completed, i.e. in 2013 were paid the funds for training of people included in it in preceding periods), and of the nature of the project cycle of OP schemes. In 2013 and 2014 expire the implementation periods of a number of HRD OP schemes, which would require finalising the project activities. The reduced number of individuals included in HRD OP in 2013 compared to 2012, was not balanced by the increased number of individuals included in programmes and measures, financed by the state budget.
33
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
ACTIVE POLICIES OF THE LABOUR MARKET

An indicator for the input of resources was also the ratio between the expenses for the active labour market policy aimed at the unemployed (for implementing programmes, promotion measures and HRD OP schemes), and the average annual number of unemployed registered at the labour offices (Fig. 4). In 2013 some BGN 933 per one unemployed were spent for active labour market policy aimed at the unemployed, i.e. by BGN 436 more compared to the preceding year. The growth was due to almost doubling the finances for active labour market policy for the unemployed (2012: BGN 181 304.4 thousand, 2013: BGN 346 579.0 thousand), regardless that the average annual number of the registered unemployed also increased, albeit to a considerably smaller extend (2012–364 537 people, 2013–371 380 people).
34
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
ACTIVE POLICIES OF THE LABOUR MARKET

The active labour market policy was aimed at the unemployed and employed. The unemployed were included in training and employment (under EPA programmes and promotion measures and under the HRD OP). Their number in 2013 was 115 8021, including:

  • unemployed placed in employment and in post-training employment – 83 693;
  • unemployed included in training – 30 737;
  • unemployed provided with consultancy under the scheme “Encouraging the launching of projects for developing own business”, Component І – 1372.
The employed provided with training for acquiring vocational qualification and/or key competences under the HRD OP schemes were 56 587.

Over the year the NEA implemented 15 programmes, 23 measures under the Employment Promotion Act, as well as a number of HRD OP schemes. Furthermore in 2013 some 196 regional programmes were active, as well as other programmes implemented in partnership with the LODs. The variety of active policy tools allowed for providing support to unemployed and employed, specifically aimed at their individual needs and life situations.
1 Some HRD OP schemes (“Development”, “Back to Work”, “First Job”, “Support for Employment”, “Qualification Services and Employment Promotion”, “Take Your Life in Your Hands”) provide both training and post-training employment, i.e. part of the unemployed take part in both training and in post-training employment.
35
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
ACTIVE POLICIES OF THE LABOUR MARKET
For a big number of unemployed, especially from the disadvantaged groups, the involvement in training or in subsidised employment was the only chance for equal participation in the labour market.

In the initiatives of the active labour market policy in 2013 were included a total of 92 601 women (of whom: 36 720 – in programmes and promotion measures and 55 881 – in training and post-training employment under HRD OP). The share of women in the total number of the people covered was 53.7%.

The young people aged up to 292, included in active labour market policy in 2013 were 43 470. Out of them: 16 277 – in EPA programmes and promotion measures and 27 193 were included in HRD OP schemes. Their share in the total number of people covered was 25.2% and has grown compared to the previous year by 0.4 pp.

The number of people aged over 50, included in active labour market policy initiatives was 38 467. Their relative share was 22.3% and has decreased by 4.8 pp compared 2012. The number of the long-term unemployed included in training and employment under programmes, measures and HRD OP was 31 478 (including in programmes and measures – 21 951, and in HRD OP – 9527). Their share in the total number of people covered by the active policy was 18.3% and has increased compared to 2012 by 4.6 pp.

For the social integration of one of the most vulnerable groups on the labour market – the unemployed with disabilities – were implemented programmes and measures under the EPA, providing employment specifically to the target group representatives. The monthly average of the people included over the year was 2736, or 9.1% of all the people covered by programmes and measures. This share compared to the share of the unemployed with disabilities in the total number of the unemployed in 2013 which was 4,2%, showed overproportional participation of the unemployed with disabilities in the active policy initiatives implemented with financing from the national budget. The unemployed people with disabilities were included also in all the other programmes, measures and HRD OP schemes, and their number in 2013 was 3877, or 2.2% of the total number of people included. Their share compared to the preceding year has risen by 0.7 pp.

1. Implementation of training and employment programmes and measures financed by the state budget.

2 In some HRD OP schemes in the group of young people aged up to 29 were included also young people up to 25, and in the group of people over 50 – people over 55.
36
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
ACTIVE POLICIES OF THE LABOUR MARKET
Programmes and projects, financed with state budget funds, offer to the unemployed, mainly from the disadvantaged groups on the labour market, in principle temporary employment, thus aiming to preserve or improve their work habits and skills. Their participation in such programmes was a transition to a subsequent employment in the primary labour market. The promotion measures provided for in the Employment Promotion Act stimulate the employers, through provision of subsidies to create jobs, apply flexible working hours, employ for a certain period of time unemployed from the disadvantaged groups. Thus on the one hand new jobs were opened on the primary labour market, and on the other hand the employment of people from the disadvantaged groups was subsidised.

In 2013 the monthly average of people who had worked under employment and training programmes and measures was 30 021 people (some of them started their work in the previous year), by 9421 (45.7%) more than those who had worked in the same period of 2012. The monthly average of people who worked under programmes was 23 727, and the number of people who worked under promotion measures – 6295. Number


The comparison of the monthly average number of those who worked under programmes and measures to the number of the unemployed registered at the labour offices, gives the indicator “intensity of support for employment promotion” financed by the state budget.
37
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
ACTIVE POLICIES OF THE LABOUR MARKET
In 2013 out of 100 unemployed in Bulgaria under programmes and promotion measures on average per month had worked 8 people (2012: 6 people). In 2013 both the monthly average of the registered unemployed and the monthly average of those who worked under programmes and measures had risen compared to the previous year. The rate of increase in the number of people who worked under programmes and measures was considerably higher (45.7%) than the rate of increase in the number of the registered unemployed (1.9%).

The new people covered by employment and training programmes and measures were 67 493 (by 28 095 or one and a half times more than in 2012), including: by programmes – 57 336 and by measures – 10 157.

In 2013 for implementation of programmes and measures funds amounting to BGN 84 092.7 thousand were spent, which was an increase by BGN 23 235.1 thousand ((38.2%) in comparison to 2012. The funds for implementation of programmes increased by 30.8% to a level of BGN 68 401.3 thousand, while those for implementation of measures increased almost twice and reached BGN 15 691.4 thousand.

2. Implementation of schemes under the Human Resources Development Operational Programme financed by the European Social Fund

During the year the National Employment Agency continued to implement projects started in previous periods under the HRD OP that complement, expand and build on the active and preventive labour market measures, provided for in the National Action Plan for Employment 2013 and have direct impact on the labour market situation.

In 2013 the training and employment schemes of the Human Resources Development Operational Programme covered a total of 104 654 people (of which: in training – 80 472 unemployed and employed, and in internships, employment and post-training employment – 22 810 unemployed).

For implementing the schemes under the Human Resources Development Operational Programme a total of BGN 310 517.8 thousand from the European Social Fund was spent.
38
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
ACTIVE POLICIES OF THE LABOUR MARKET
3. Grouping of the initiatives implemented in 2013 by active policy objectives

According to the objectives of the active labour market policy, the programmes and promotion measures funded by the state budget, and the HRD OP schemes funded by the European Social Fund may be grouped into several areas:

3.1. For upgrading the knowledge and skills of the employed and unemployed

In 2013 a priority for the labour market policy was the training of both unemployed and employed. This priority was implemented with a great success. Investments in training contributed for improving the match of supply and demand on the labour market. In 2013 activities for gaining skills, vocational qualifications and key competences were carried out mainly within the framework of HRD OP.

3.1.1. Training of unemployed

Over the year 2013 in training were included 30 737 unemployed (including in training under the HRD OP schemes – 23 885 individuals, in training under programmes funded by state budget – 6610 individuals, in training referred to in Art. 63 of the EPA – 242 individuals).

The largest number of unemployed (15 722) were included in training in key competences under the “Support for Employment” scheme. The training provided was required for helping the representatives of the vulnerable groups adapt to the working conditions, for improving their self-confidence and regaining their work habits.

The “Qualification Services and Employment Promotion” scheme was implemented with the aim of enhancing the employability of the unemployed through training for acquiring or upgrading vocational qualification. Successful training participants were placed in internship with employer for a period of 3 months.

In 2013 with state budget funds a number of programmes and projects3, were also implemented, providing training to the unemployed, in which a total of 6610 people took part.

The National Employment Agency provided also vocational qualification training for adults, in line with the labour market needs and compliant with the provisions of art. 63, item 1 of the EPA.
3 “Beautiful Bulgaria” programme, “A Professional” project, “Enhancing the Employability of Unemployed through Improved Vocational and Key Competence” project, “A Chance for Work 2013” project, “A Chance for Success” project, other programmes that were implemented in partnership with the LODs.
39
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
ACTIVE POLICIES OF THE LABOUR MARKET
3.1.2. Training of employed

The provision of training to the employed is aimed to improve their knowledge and skills, which in practice is an adjustment of the labour force to the new requirements of employers and prevention from losing their jobs. The employed may attend training only under the HRD OP schemes. Their number in 2013 was 56 587.

The “I can Do More” scheme enabled the employed and self-employed to get actively involved in lifelong learning for improving their knowledge and skills, and improving their competitiveness on the labour market.

The implementation of the “Qualification Services and Training for Employed” scheme – phase 3 also created conditions for wide application of the principles of lifelong learning.

3.2. For supporting the start of own business activity by the unemployed

Development of independent business activity plays a key role for reducing the unemployment and for the economy in general, although in times of crisis and due to the decreased demand the newly established businesses have to establish their positions in an extremely difficult economic environment and endure a strong competitive pressure. In 2013 the National Employment Agency supported 57 unemployed with approved business project to start their own business activity. Furthermore 92 unemployed entitled to cash benefits, willing to start their own businesses for manufacturing of goods and/or for services, upon approval of their business projects, were granted lump-sum amounts at the account of the “Unemployment” Fund.

The project entitled “Support for Entrepreneurial Bulgarians – Component I” was implemented under “Promoting the Launch of Projects for Starting Own Businesses” scheme. This project provided to approved unemployed registered at the labour offices across the country training in entrepreneurial, managerial and business skills, as well as consultancy how to start own business. Under Component III the people who have launched projects under Component II were provided with services by consultancy companies and business centres.

40
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
ACTIVE POLICIES OF THE LABOUR MARKET
3.3. For providing support and access to employment to the unemployed from the disadvantaged groups on the labour market

3.3.1. Young people aged up to 29

In 2013 for a second consecutive year continued the implementation of the national initiative “Jobs for Young People in Bulgaria” 2012-2013.

Young people participated in all programmes and measures under the EPA, while for some of these they were the only priority group. The number of all young people aged up to 29, included in employment and training under programmes and promotion measures in 2013 was 16 277, and in schemes under the Operational Programme – 27 193.

One successful programme that facilitated the young people’s transition from education to employment was the “Career Start” programme. The approach used in the “Career Start” programme was applied and developed through the scheme “Support for Institutional Building of the Labour Market, Social Inclusion and Healthcare Institutions” (“Start in the Administration” project). In the framework of the national programme “To Activate the Inactive Persons”, psychologists employed in the labour offices provided to the unemployed (including to unemployed young people) psychological assistance and motivation training. The young people were getting support also through consultancy by case managers. As a result of the programme implementation 4743 unemployed young people aged up to 29 registered in the LODs.

With the aim of curbing the high youth unemployment in the country and creating conditions for easier adjustment of young people to work environment, in July 2013 were made amendments to the Employment Promotion Act, which introduced new promotion measures for young people: for flexible part-time working hours for long-term unemployed aged up to 29; for employment of young people – secondary or higher education graduates with no employment experience; for on-the-job training supervised by a mentor (coach). To mitigate the negative impact of the crisis on young people the “Creation of Youth Employment by Providing Internship Opportunities” scheme aimed at finding first employment for unemployed young people who have graduated secondary or higher education, as well as the “First Job” scheme were implemented.

The “New Job” scheme also provided incentives to employers to hire unemployed young people, and besides support for the costs of the labour, granted also support for the investment expenditure related to the jobs created.
41
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
ACTIVE POLICIES OF THE LABOUR MARKET
3.3.2. Unemployed people with disabilities

In 2013 in programmes and promotion measures designed specifically for unemployed people with disabilities (National Programme for Employment and Training of People with Permanent Disabilities, “Interest-free Loan for People with Disabilities” programme ) and EPA promotion measures were included 3008 people, with monthly average of 2736 people in employment, and BGN 10 434.0 thousand spent. In training, in internships and in posttraining employment under the HRD OP schemes were included a total of 869 people with disabilities or with reduced work capacity. In training activities were included 631 unemployed and employed people with disabilities; in internship and post-training employment – 202 unemployed people with reduced work capacity, and in consultancy – 36 people with disabilities or reduced work capacity.

3.3.3. Unemployed aged over 50

Unemployed aged over 50 were included with priority in many programmes, promotion measures and HRD OP schemes. In total in the active policy initiatives were included 38 467 unemployed and employed aged over 50 of whom included in EPA programmes and measures – 21 609 people, and in HRD OP4 schemes – 16 858 people (of these: 10 833 unemployed and employed were included in training and 5 794 unemployed – in internship and in post-training employment, and 231 unemployed – in consultancy). There were also specialised programmes and promotion measures for reducing the unemployment among older adults.

The registered unemployed aged over 50 were among the target groups of the “Development” scheme. They were the group with the largest share (42.5%) in the total number of those covered by training for acquisition or upgrading vocational qualification under the scheme. The share of older workers placed in post-training employment under the scheme was 41.6%.

3.3.4. For creating employment for the unemployed in social services provision

Creating employment for the unemployed in social services provision is an active labour market policy approach with a powerful social impact which is implemented via the national programme “Assistants to People with Disabilities”. It created jobs for the unemployed in working age who provide constant care for a relative. “Back to Work” scheme continued. It was aimed at complementing the policy for reconciliation of professional and family life.
4 In some HRD OP schemes in the age group of people over 50 were included also people over 55.
42
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
ACTIVE POLICIES OF THE LABOUR MARKET
3.3.5. Other vulnerable groups on the labour market

The long-term unemployed with full work capacity and receiving social assistance benefits have low chances for finding a job on the primary labour market and therefore need specific measures. They were the target group of the national programme “From Social Assistance to Employment” which continued to be implemented. Half of the people covered by the programme were women (50.7%), 49.8% were long-term unemployed, 33.8% were unemployed aged over 50, and 16.1% were young people aged up to 29. On average per month under the programme worked 13 912 people.

The implementation of the „Support for Employment” scheme encouraged employers to provide jobs for the registered unemployed, with priority for the people from the disadvantaged groups on the labour market.

Access to employment for the unemployed in disadvantaged situation on the labour market was provided also by 196 regional employment programmes which addressed specific local labour market issues, as well as by the EPA measure which provided incentives to employers to hire long-term unemployed referred to them by the NEA units.

The aim of the national programme “To Activate the Inactive Persons” was to activate and include in the labour market inactive and discouraged persons. In 2013 the unemployed from the vulnerable groups were provided with psychological support and motivation training. To that end the LODs appointed 33 unemployed psychologists. In 2013 under this programme were appointed 10 case managers. As a result of the programme implementation 12 993 inactive persons have registered as unemployed at the labour offices (out of which 116 people have started training, 3434 were placed in employment, including 2068 – under programmes and measures).

The scheme “Take Your Life in Your Hands” targeted the most vulnerable group at the highest risk – the discouraged and inactive persons.

One EPA measure encouraged the employers to create apprenticeship jobs for the unemployed with lower secondary education or lower education and no qualification, as well as to lone parents (adopters) and mothers with children aged under 3, and between 3 and 5.
43
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
ACTIVE POLICIES OF THE LABOUR MARKET
3.4. For retaining the existing and opening of new jobs, and for overcoming the consequences of the economic crisis for the labour market

National Employment Agency provided support for creating and maintaining employment, including through promotion of geographical mobility with the aim to secure employment and encourage employers to create part-time jobs in compliance with the provisions of EPA:

  • for part-time work;
  • for the first five jobs created by employers – microenterprises;
  • for territorial mobility of unemployed people
The “Closer to Job” scheme complemented and expanded the envisaged in the National Action Plan for Employment 2013 measures for promotion of mobility of the employed by providing incentives to the employers for hiring people from settlements and regions, different from the localities, where they operate.

Under the national programme “New Opportunity for Employment” the people laid off as a consequence of the economic crisis were prioritised to receive a special package of services.

The coverage of the anti-crisis measures was further widened by the implementation of “Adaptability” and “Development” schemes under HRD OP.
44
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
INTEGRATION IN THE EUROPEAN LABOUR MARKET

INTEGRATION IN THE EUROPEAN LABOUR MARKET

After the global economic crisis which started in 2008/2009 one of the European Commission’s main goals is to take immediate actions for increasing the number of jobs and improving the labour market situation. In this respect encouraging the international mobility is one of the solutions for the problem that emerged in the recent years – the growing unemployment as a negative consequence of the crisis for the labour market.

Bulgaria is a full member of the European Employment Services network (ЕURES) and through its job-broking services provides to the Bulgarian citizens information about the opportunities for work and living conditions in the European Economic Area. Thus the National Employment Agency – the institution engaged with curbing the unemployment in the country – implements the exchange and export of work force.

In this regard in 2013, the National Employment Agency organised 17 job fairs and job interviews for work in other EU Member States, 118 information events for job seekers and secondary and higher education graduates, 11 information events for employers, 12 information sessions for the employees of LODs and the Regional Employment Services Directorates. These events resulted in about 1300 people starting work and about 50 young people included in dual/vocational training in Germany.

In January were organised interviews in Sofia, Haskovo and Razgrad to recruit workforce for jobs offered by Spanish employers. The total number of the approved during the interviews workers was 1196. The actual number of people who started work in Spain was 733. In February was organised and conducted an interview for the jobs offered by a theme park Europa-Park in the town of Rust, Germany with the participation of the employer and representatives of the Headquarters for International Placement Services in Bonn (ZAV). In March was announced recruitment of job applicants for work in McDonalds South – Germany. In March in Sofia was organised and conducted recruitment interview for animators in the Spanish Hotel Chain Iberostar. In April in Dobrich a job fair was organised for the tourist sector with the participation of representatives from the Headquarters for International Placement Services in Bonn (ZAV), Germany. In May a job fair for engineering personnel was organised in Gabrovo with the participation of EURES representatives from Sweden, Norway and Germany.
In July under a “Mobility Project” together with representatives of ZAV Germany in Plovdiv, Stara Zagora and Sofia were organised Information Days and interviews with job seekers for work in Germany. In September in Varna were conducted tests for welders for work in shipyards in Finland, organised together with the Finnish Company Barona.
45
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
INTEGRATION IN THE EUROPEAN LABOUR MARKET
In September in Burgas together with ZAV – Germany were organised Information Days and advance interviews for work in Germany in the sector of accommodation and food service activities, and technical and computer sciences. In October European Job Day – international information job fair in the area of accommodation and food service activities was organised in Varna. It was attended by participants from eight countries: Austria, Germany, Netherlands, Slovakia, Romania, Hungary, Sweden and UK. About 900 job interviews were conducted.

In 2013 the Bulgarian EURES advisors and assistants provided consultations to more than 36 000 job seekers with and without registration in the LODs.

The EURES network continued to register high interest in online visits. Evidence for that is the number of people registered in the Bulgarian EURES website (in 2013 they were 569, with total number of 5678 registered individuals), as well as the growing number of unique visitors for the period January-December – 186 110 compared to the total of 449 334 visits.

In its work for the implementation of the international agreements with partner services for export and exchange of work force the NEA is seeking to achieve maximum occupancy of the job vacancies announced by the foreign employers in their offers, while providing a maximum visibility and publicity for the offers submitted to NEA.

The implementation of the job-broking commitments under the Agreement between the Bulgarian government and the government of the Federal Republic of Germany for employment of construction workers continued.

Under the agreement with the Federal Employment Service, Nuremberg for summer employment of Bulgarian students in Germany after testing their language skills were approved 148 students.

In the end of 2011 an agreement was signed with Israel for job-broking for temporary work. Received and processed were the documents of 1311 applicants. Practical exams were conducted with the recruited 1361 job applicants, and in October 2013, 246 workers left for Israel.

In 2013 in compliance with the policy for regulating the national labour market a total of 706 work permits were issued to third country nationals.

Short term employment without work permits was registered in the case of 56 foreign nationals – citizens of Turkey, Serbia, India, Pakistan and Albania.
46
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
INTEGRATION IN THE EUROPEAN LABOUR MARKET
In 2013 the tendency for gradual increase in the number of registered job placement agencies continued, with a total of 131 certificates of registration issued, including: for Bulgaria – 65, for work abroad – 53, for maritime specialists – 13.

As of 31.12.2013г valid certificates for job placement activities were held by 555 companies – job placement agencies.

Based on the information provided to the NEA by the registered job placement agencies in 2013 the people placed in employment in Bulgaria were 3395; maritime specialists on board of ships under a flag of convenience – 7684, Bulgarian nationals abroad – 50, including in Denmark – 45, Portugal – 3 and Germany – 2. Compared to last year the number of people placed in employment abroad by the job placement agencies decreased.

In 2013 continued the tendency for increasing the number of enterprises registered at the NEA for provision of temporary work. As of 31.12.2013 were issued 22 certificates of registration to agencies providing temporary work.
47
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF WORK

IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF WORK

The ongoing efforts for establishing the NEA as a modern public employment service are linked to the constant upgrading of the job broking activities, expanding the coverage and improving the quality of the services offered by the labour offices to the jobseekers and employers. The main areas for modernising the placement services are related to the development of an efficient organisation facilitating the access to services for the customers of labour offices, to upgrading the information environment and improved communication, to applying individual approach in the process of service provision.

All labour offices continue to apply the already proven as successful process method of work. In 2013 29 more LODs introduced the service model “One-stop-shop”. The number of LODs, which implement this model, is now 75.

The mediators appointed under the scheme “Improving the quality of the services provided by NEA to individuals and business with a focus on the vulnerable groups on the labour market – Let us be successful together” also worked with the disadvantaged groups. Over the year 100 new mediators were appointed under this scheme, and by 31.12.2013 there were 440 such mediators in all LODs. Their distribution across the country depended on the concentration of the different vulnerable groups by settlements.

For improving the quality of the job-broking services offered to job seekers and employers, and with regards to the amendments and addendums to the EPA, in September 2013 the Technology of work in the LODs was updated.

With a view to improving the quality of the services for young people and reducing the youth unemployment the national initiative “Jobs for Young People in Bulgaria” continued to be implemented for a second consecutive year.

Better service quality was provided also through the national programme “To Activate the Inactive Persons” which is aimed at the inactive and discouraged people. Over the year in the framework of this programme the unemployed from the vulnerable groups on the labour market benefited from the services of specially trained case managers. In 2013 the NP “Activate the Inactive Persons” was expanded, which resulted in appointing in the LODs in the regional centres 33 psychologists and after specialised training – 10 case managers. The psychologists provided individual psychological support to 1097 unemployed, and the group forms were attended by 1238 people. The case managers provided 1686 individual consultations.
48
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF WORK
Since August 2013 a new service has been provided to the unemployed. As a pilot in the regional LODs with psychologists, hired (incl. under the NP “To Activate the Inactive Persons”) the service “Job Search Workshop” was launched, which is aimed at the specific needs of the job seekers. In the period from August until December were organised and conducted 631 workshops.

In 2013 continued the practice of expanding the coverage of people to whom services were provided by the out-reach employees of the LODs, and provision of employment service in the most remote areas. As of 31.12.2013 the number of the out-reach staff positions was 494 in 74 LODs, opened on the territory of 152 municipalities.

The information and technical support of the NEA system and the e-services are an essential factor for its efficient management and for the quality of the services provided. The information and interactive sections on the NEA website were updated and maintained on a regular basis (e-job fair, the published job vacancies, news, etc.). In 2013 were registered 3 067 660 visits to the NEA website, which is an increase by 48.4% compared to 2012. Out of all visits 940 130 (30.7%) were unique visits. In 2013 was launched the new official NEA website. The latest achievements in the web design and programming were applied for its development.
49
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
SOCIAL PARTNERSHIP AND SOCIAL DIALOGUE

SOCIAL PARTNERSHIP AND SOCIAL DIALOGUE

The social partners and the social dialogue are a key factor contributing for the implementation of the state policy for employment on all levels. The social partners play a significant role for the development and implementation of the active employment policy in the country, both at regional and at local level.

The established practice for cooperation and joint activities with the representative organisations of employers, of employees and with NGOs representatives, enhance the efficiency of the NEA activities in implementing active programmes and measures, vocational training and HRD OP schemes.

In 2013 the Board at the Executive Director of NEA continued its active work. The Board had 12 meetings over the year – 4 with attendance, and 8 postal.

Essential for the development of the social dialogue is the work of the Employment Commissions. The social partnership of NEA territorial structures is implemented through the participation in the Employment Commissions at the Regional Development Councils and in the Cooperation Councils at the LODs. At their meetings on a regular basis they review, discuss and analyse the situation and the problems of the regional and local labour market, identify the priorities of the regional employment policy based on the national priorities, and organise the development of regional employment programmes for overcoming the specific labour market related problems, for enhancing the labour supply and the employment in the specific region, for training the workforce.

The Cooperation Councils at the LODs directly monitor and supervise the implemented employment policy, while observing the principles of openness, publicity and transparency. In 2013 the Cooperation Councils had 812 meetings. The usual responsibilities of the Cooperation Councils are: to select and assess the employers’ applications for use of promotion measures provided for in the EPA; to report on the implementation of the LOD Action Plan and on the implementation of the active employment policy in 2013, i.e. to discuss the progress and the specific results of the implementation of the HRD OP schemes; the findings of the joint on-the-spot checks at the employers, etc.

In 2013 meetings initiated by the directors of the NEA territorial units were conducted with regional governors, mayors and deputy mayors, and representatives of municipal administrations, where they discussed issues, related to the implementation of employment programmes and measures, the unemployment rate and the situation on the local labour markets, mass redundancies in companies from the region, job fairs, active HRD OP schemes and the opportunities of the European network EURES for advertising job vacancies and finding jobs in the EU Member States.
50
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
SOCIAL PARTNERSHIP AND SOCIAL DIALOGUE
The inter-institutional cooperation was strengthened over the year by using successful methods and practices for inter-sector partnerships. This resulted in enhanced commitment and activity on behalf of the social partners for solving the problems with the employment and unemployment at both local and regional levels.
51
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
INTERNATIONAL ACTIVITY

INTERNATIONAL ACTIVITY

The National Employment Agency had intensive international activity, maintaining its contacts with the European employment services in the framework of PES and WAPES, and actively introducing its work at international forums. Furthermore NEA is a member of the regional (Balkan) network. One key aspect of the international activity is the joint work on different projects and initiatives which play an important role for solving many labour market challenges at national level.

Balkan Centre (CPESSEC)

In 2013 the presidency of the Balkan Centre was hold by Montenegro. On 11 and 12 of April in Budva and on 14 and 15 of November in Bar took place the regular expert and managerial conferences of the Centre of Public Employment Services of Southeast European Countries (CPESSEC). The topics of the managerial conferences were respectively “Impact of the economic crisis on youth employment – effects of the financial stimulus packages”, and “Public Employment Services Boosting Economy Competitiveness”, and of the expert conference – “The role and importance of career management skills for increasing employability level”, and “The Role of Media in Promoting Employment Policies and in Changing the Attitudes of Participants in the Labour Market”. The NEA representatives made presentations on these topics.

In July 2013 in English and in Serbian was published Statistical Bulletin No.4 (available on the CPESSEC website – http://www.cpessec.org/) for which data about Bulgaria in 2012 was aggregated, systematised, updated and added.

Since mid 2009 on a monthly basis on the CPESSEC website the nine Member States plus the newly joined Hungary fill in 2 statistical forms.

In 2013 the NEA representatives took part in international meetings, forums and conferences both in the EU Member States and in other countries.

One of the main topics in 2013 again was limiting the negative impact of the crisis on the young people. Furthermore a number of conferences were organised on that topic among which:

  • Youth Unemployment and Vocational Training – January 2013, Bonn, Germany;
  • Public Employment Services and Youth's paths to purpose – March 2013, Stockholm, Sweden;
52
YEARBOOK 2013
Employment Agency
INTERNATIONAL ACTIVITY
  • Introducing Youth Guarantee – July 2013, Berlin, Germany;
  • Practical support for the design and implementation of Youth Guarantee schemes – October 2013, La Hulpe, Belgium.
Other major international events, where NEA representatives took part were:

  • Long-Term Unemployment Conference, hosted by the World Association of Public Employment Services – February 2013, Washington, USA;
  • PARES conference – Strategic dialogue in the Public Employment Services partnership network – October 2013, Brussels, Belgium;
  • Participation in a workshop for knowledge and experience transfer – “PES approaches to low-skilled adults and young people” – November 2013, Oslo, Norway;
  • Participation in the implementation of “Transfer of good practices and models for social inclusion of long-term unemployed” project – November 2013, Dortmund, Germany;
  • Participation in a seminar on “Sharing real lessons and good practice in relation to European employment” – November 2013, Brussels, Belgium;
  • Conference on “Investing in people and skills” – December 2013, Vienna, Austria;
  • Participation in expert meeting on the problems of migration: “Problems of increased immigration of Bulgarian nationals” – December 2013, Dortmund, Germany
53
  • Abbreviation used
  • The year in brief
  • Employment
  • Unemployment
  • Labour demand
  • Job-broking services
  • Active policies of the labour market
  • Intergration in the European labour market
  • Improving the quality of work
  • Social patnership and social dialogue
  • International activity
  • Annexes